HR professionals need to adapt to changing objectives and market conditions to recruit, select, and retain employees with the necessary skills to further organizational goals—all while steering clear of legal and other risks. Professor Hausknecht draws on his research, teaching, and consulting experience in staffing to provide a relevant and rigorous overview of the field. He offers numerous practical examples to help build the skills needed to staff modern-day organizations and grounds his recommendations in the latest research findings.

Instead of HR professionals, front-line managers are now being asked to assess their personnel needs in the workplace and make hiring —or firing—choices that fit those needs. Many managers have not been trained on how to decide among candidates to make the best choices to fit their team. These choices are not just about creating test questions or reading resumes, but also about managing the interpersonal communication that must occur between hirer and candidate.

Cornell University’s Professor Livingston’s teaching combines well-supported theoretical evidence with real-world examples and case studies to make the subject matter both understandable and easily applicable to a wide variety of managing environments. She focuses not just on the “how” of hiring and interviewing, but on the “why” so that individual managers and decision makers can be flexible and agile in changing environments and with changing needs.

Attracting the right talent to the right position from the start is crucial for organizational success. Once you have your talent in place, retention is an equally important challenge. It costs your organization effort and money every time you need to bring in someone new. As organizations try to do more with less, resources are scaled back and compensation plays a more important role in your talent-management strategy, making it essential to identify and select compensation elements that provide the highest return.

Through the research and expertise of Dr. Barrington and Dr. Thomas, this course will teach you to compare and contrast different pay systems. Doing so will allow you to attract and retain key talent within your organization while also identifying internal equity concerns that may exist.

In this course, you will explore how to effectively attract and retain talent by creating a powerful employment brand that resonates with different parts of the workforce, and theory on effective selection of employees based on concepts of job and organizational fit. Through the business school approach of case studies you will apply the theories and uses of social media tools to your own organization. Explore how social media is shaping up to continue to be valuable to the HR professional, and apply this knowledge to your recruiting and retention activities today.

Organizations today face a multitude of challenges when it comes to effectively managing their talent.  In mature markets, demographic trends are forcing companies to accelerate their efforts to build a pipeline of future leaders. In emerging markets, companies must develop talent strategies that are both nimble and effective at engaging and retaining key human capital. To achieve these goals, companies need an integrated, systematic approach to attracting, developing, engaging, and retaining critical talent.

Cornell University Professor Brad Bell offers a learning experience that challenges students to dig deeper into understanding their organization’s key talent management challenges and uncovers solutions that can be used to overcome these challenges. This course adopts a systems view of talent management in order to demonstrate that various talent practices and processes need to be aligned to create effective solutions. It also examines current trends and cutting-edge thinking in the talent management field.

Compensation plays a critical role in attracting and retaining the right talent to meet organizational goals. Performance is each individual's contribution toward these goals. An effective compensation strategy should ensure individual performance and organizational outcomes are connected.

Decisions made regarding the compensation structure must also be aligned with the organization’s financial ability to pay. Can you afford the pay-for-performance system in good times and in bad? Learn how to design and evaluate your compensation strategy as you determine how to measure performance using the expertise of Dr. Barrington and Dr. Thomas.

After completing this course you will be able to understand the challenges of measuring and compensating on the basis of performance in a way that aligns with the goals and needs of your organization.