In this first online course of eCornell's Marketing Strategy certificate program, you will learn about the role marketing plays within an organization, some ethical questions that surround marketing practices, the impact that a strategic approach can have on marketing within your organization, and the components of a well-defined marketing strategy and overall business strategy. In defining how the organization will successfully engage customers, prospects and competitors in the market arena, you will discover how to think strategically about the market you're in, why you're in that market, and what you're trying to accomplish in that market. You'll also gain a strategic view of your organization's "brand."

Adding new products to a company's portfolio keeps revenues up and promotes innovation in the market. And offering products that follow a logical cycle matched to consumers' needs will help promote "lifetime customers," a concept closely tied to "lifetime value." However, innovation alone will not determine the success or failure of a product.

This fifth online course in eCornell's Marketing Strategy certificate program examines the psychological and sociological systems in which customers choose whether to adopt new products and services, and how the product lifecycle is connected to new-product diffusion. You will apply the concept of a marketing continuum to develop an effective marketing program, leverage an understanding of social systems to improve new product diffusion, and develop strategies to increase product adoption and sales.

Strategic marketing decisions are informed by data, and that data is best reviewed through a framework. But because different frameworks provide value to the marketing decision maker, you will review and learn how to use best practices for varying data sets. Through these strategic tools, you will apply the core marketing concepts of segmentation, targeting and positioning to a product or service. You will then explore the strategic role of pricing and methods for influencing buying decisions. You will also address common pricing errors and identify instances of pricing mistakes in the market.

Marketing professionals rely on clearly defined goals to determine the course of action when placing a product in the market. Leveraging research to learn more about your target audience is the main subject of this third online course in the Marketing Strategy certificate program. In this course you will learn how to be an intelligent consumer of information when it comes to marketing research and analysis, so you can become a more effective decision maker. You will first look at marketing research, including the purpose and goals of research, how to balance the ideal with reality in doing research, and how to apply the six stages of research to a marketing situation.

Next you will examine different ways to analyze the data acquired through marketing research. Using formulas to determine how cannibalization affects the profitability of new products and the value of a long-term customer, you will perform a basic sensitivity analysis to assess the robustness of your results.

Exploring the reasons why brands are so valuable and the factors that contribute to that value is a key part of developing a comprehensive marketing strategy.

This course is the fourth online course in eCornell's Marketing Strategy certificate program, and is based on the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University MBA marketing content.

Participants will examine the concept of branding through a strategic lens to understand why brands are so valuable, and explore the many factors that contribute to that value. You'll learn that creating a memorable brand takes much more than just developing a strong image. Through the concept of brand equity, you will explore the various aspects of a brand's success that are created internally, and influenced externally by consumers.

You will evaluate the value brands provide to both the firm and the consumer, and identify the qualities that create an effective brand image. Real-world examples will illustrate how marketing communication tools and techniques that can be used to build brand equity.

In the first course (LSM521) you reviewed "The Four P's of Marketing." In this sixth course in eCornell's Marketing Strategy certificate program, you dive deeper into the "Forgotten P" Place.

In marketing, this "place" is the marketing channel. Channel function, design and strategy will all be explored and applied to real-life cases. You will define marketing channels and learn how to leverage them to deliver messaging to potential consumers.

Finally, you will dive into the world of international marketing and distribution through the use of channel expansion strategies. Discover the nuances of global markets, recognizing and identifying the types of global organizations and exploring the pros and cons of globalization.

To create a more customer-centric organization -- and improve sales, market share, and margins -- you need to know what your customers want. In this course, you'll use the statistical method of conjoint analysis to uncover the product attributes most influential to your customers. By simulating the market, you'll run relevant scenarios to answer questions such as: What would happen if we lowered our price, or offered quality improvements? Which customers should we go after? And, if we give our customers more of one attribute, can we give them less of another?

In this course, you'll use the statistical method of cluster analysis to meaningfully segment and target your market based on customer needs and preferences. Through interactive, applied activities, you'll analyze how customers naturally segment themselves within your market -- and how to predict and target the most profitable segments for your business. Customer data analyzed are similar to what is typically commissioned from market research firms.

To improve sales and market share, knowing what consumers want isn't enough. You also need to know what they believe your product or service, and your competitors', provides. In this course, you'll create and use perceptual maps to identify which dimensions consumers use to differentiate among products, and how they perceive your products relative to competitors'. These maps are valuable for identifying opportunities to introduce and position new products, repositioning existing products, and identifying your true competitors.

Successful customer relationship management encompasses thousands of transactions and impressions, over many years. But which customers are most worth your time and resources? How do firms determine how long they need to keep customers before they become profitable? Analyzing data (such as Big Data) allows marketers to make smarter predictions using the Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) model, which scores current and potential customers based on characteristics such as churn rate, discount rate, retention cost and forecasts of remaining customer lifetime. In this course, you'll use the CLV model to segment and target customers based on their potential long-term value, and build corresponding retention and divestment strategies.

Digital advertising campaigns are an increasingly important element of most brands’ marketing mix and are designed to achieve specific goals: increase brand awareness, drive traffic to the advertiser’s website, and achieve consumer conversions. And although digital advertising generates a huge amount of data, not knowing how to interpret it could result in inefficient spending and missed opportunities.

This course introduces the use of analytics and data to measure the extent to which the goals of digital campaigns are being achieved, and thereby provides a roadmap for you to make more informed spending decisions. Through the application of various analytical tools, such as effectiveness and efficiency metrics, attribution modeling, and the design of randomized controlled trials, you—as a buyer or seller of digital advertising—will be more successful at monetizing digital assets.

You explore this content through a mix of input from industry experts, a hands-on course project, and the presentation of best practices by Cornell University Professor Sachin Gupta. Your fellow students and your instructor will also help broaden your understanding of digital advertising analytics and its impact on your advertising strategy.

Given all the players, platforms and opportunities associated with digital marketing, it can seem overwhelming. Don’t let that stop you.

This course provides  a clear overview of the digital marketing world.  Discover  how players such as ad networks, demand-side platforms and data management platforms interact with advertisers, agencies and publishers. Then learn how to use time-proven frameworks to assess your customers’ needs and identify your primary marketing objectives. Once you’ve put that all together, you’ll learn how to  evaluate the performance of digital marketing campaigns. 

Using paid media, such as buying ad space on well-known websites, may be the fastest way to promote a product or service on digital platforms. In addition to display ads, paid media includes initiatives like search engine marketing, email marketing, video marketing, social media ads, and mobile ads. 

This course provides a tour of opportunities and strategies associated with these various paid media channels, and guides you in drafting a paid media marketing plan that addresses your own marketing objectives.  

Note: This course assumes that you have completed LSM515, or alternatively, are familiar with “customer funnel” and “customer journey” marketing models.

Marketing within your own digital properties—such as your organization’s website, blog or social media pages—is an effective way to build deeper relationships with existing customers and attract the attention of new ones. 

This course covers the unique opportunities of “owned media” and how those differ from “paid media”. You will learn more about  content marketing, search engine optimization, social media “fan pages”, mobile apps, and virtual reality apps and assess the relevancy of owned media initiatives for your own marketing objectives. By the end of this course, you will have a plan outlining a strategy for your own potential use of these channels.

Note: This course assumes that you have completed LSM515, or alternatively, are familiar with “customer funnel” and “customer journey” marketing models.

Properly utilizing digital marketing allows you to promote your products and services while building customer relationships through “paid media” and “owned media” initiatives. So how do you put them together to create a comprehensive, effective marketing plan?  

This course will help you evaluate and combine your ideas to create a single, encompassing marketing plan.  This plan will include the priorities, resourcing and performance metrics appropriate for your organization. Once complete, you will be able to immediately put this plan in place to drive results. 

Note: This course assumes that you have completed the previous courses in this series, or alternatively, are familiar with the primary paid and owned digital media channels and are acquainted with “customer funnel” and “customer journey” marketing models.

Segmentation and targeting is the tip of the iceberg for implementing a successful marketing strategy. Markets can be sliced and diced in infinite ways; the goal is to focus your marketing activities on customers you identify as most likely to respond and buy. In this course, you'll use statistical market response modeling to develop the right marketing mix: Determine when -- and where -- to spend money on advertising and trade promotions, and how to better forecast demand for your product or service among different customers.

Your services marketing efforts depend on information. Without relevant and accurate information, every decision you make will suffer from bad input. 

A well-run marketing information system captures, organizes, analyzes, and interprets data from a wide variety of sources to create a robust portrait of the ideal customers and their specific wants or needs. With the ideal buyer in mind, you can better target them with high-impact messaging that communicates a compelling brand promise and a clear reason to buy. 

In this course, you will learn when to use internal or external market data and when to conduct your own primary research. You'll also discover how segmentation, targeting, and positioning (the STP process) translates your analysis and research findings into a positioning strategy that appeals to the right target market at the right time and at the right price. 

Services marketing is often viewed in terms of outcomes, but services marketing is also an ongoing analytic process. In this course, you will learn how to properly analyze frameworks, tools, channels, data sets, customer behavioral data, decision-making factors, and strategies that support broader marketing decisions.

Authored by Robert Kwortnik from Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration, this course will teach you how to review the way marketing works in your organization and how to create and apply a services marketing process.

To make services marketing work, you need to have a clear picture of the business environment and understand how your target customers behave. Knowing your market and assessing consumer demand can help inform and guide your marketing strategies. In this course, you will explore the role that micro and macro forces  play when conducting a situation analysis. You'll also take a deep dive into what drives consumer behavior.

You have marketing goals and you’re feeling ready to execute. Maybe you want to increase market share, retain more customers or generally broaden consumer awareness. 

But how do you turn your goals into action? And how will you measure success? In this course, you will explore how to turn marketing goals into action by developing a marketing strategy and creating an enduring brand promise.

You want your marketing efforts to generate demand. While increased demand naturally drives business and success, it does come with specific sets of challenges. 

Mitigating these challenges requires a keen understanding of demand management. In essence, demand management requires us to ask “How should we set our prices?” “How will we guarantee that our distribution partners ensure timely delivery?”

In this course, you’ll answer those questions and explore how pricing and distribution strategies can directly affect demand for your service.

It’s hard to overstate: A marketing strategy lives or dies in communication with the customer. And there’s a methodology to it—it is the culmination of all of the marketing research and analysis you've done. 

What you say, how you say it, how often you say it, the media channels you use to distribute your message, how you respond to complaints—all of this affects customers’ experiences with your brand. 

In this course, you'll take a deep dive into integrated marketing communications, or IMC. You'll explore a process-based approach to designing creative communications using a variety of methods and media. Finally, you'll examine ways to assess the performance of an IMC campaign.

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