Advancing to a more senior leadership role requires a specific set of skills. Senior leaders must shift away from tactical oversight into a more strategic and visionary role. This transition does not occur naturally and is often not a part of standard professional training, development, or onboarding. The ability to adapt to this mindset is crucial and can lead to the success or failure of an individual and/or their team.

In this course, current and potential leaders will be guided through this transition by Kate Walsh, Professor and Dean of the School of Hotel Administration, as she shares her professional expertise and research. Learners will create a personal leadership strategy and build a professional network within their organization to prepare and further their roles in the organization.

If you’re in charge of developing and leading strategic organizational change, there are certain tools and concepts you must be familiar with. In this course, the emphasis is on cultivating your ability to assess the need for change. By determining why your organization or team needs change, you’ll be able to better answer questions like: What should you change and how should the change be handled? You will explore the political and complex process of introducing change, which includes motivating others, dealing with resistance and the emotional elements of change, and finally, extending change over time and sustaining it. The course is designed to give you practice so you can initiate and carry out a change effort.

In this course, you are introduced to the principles of Servant Leadership and the importance of fostering an ethical service culture. Servant Leaders communicate ethical standards and facilitate a supportive and respectful service culture that contributes to employee empowerment. A number of cases are provided to highlight leadership challenges and approaches. Servant Leaders are distinguished by their focus on listening skills, and you will assess and develop your listening behavior using Professor Brownell’s HURIER listening model, which addresses six interrelated components: Hearing, Understanding, Remembering, Interpreting, Evaluating and Responding. The development of a strong listening environment also facilitates service within your organization. Finally, you will examine your current environment to identify opportunities to strengthen relationships and enhance the service experience of your organization.

Managers who are seen practicing what they preach and following through on promises enjoy dramatically enhanced credibility and loyalty. They inspire workers to perform well and even to go beyond what is asked of them. Credibility is not all it takes to be successful, but no trust or meaningful relationship with those you manage can happen without it.

This course, developed by Professor Tony Simons, Ph.D. of Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration, focuses on this critical element of leadership, and helps students develop the awareness, skills and habits necessary for mastering it.

In today's workforce, adaptation and responsiveness are key elements in the success for an organization. As turnaround times shorten and demands increase, organizations must leverage teams to reach strategic goals and fulfill initiatives. Based on the expertise and research of Kate Walsh, PhD, students in this course will diagnose team needs, set expectations for development, utilize conflict to augment change, and build team autonomy to support leaders in embracing a more strategic focus.

Leading across cultures is about adapting, communicating, thinking critically, and understanding your own biases. Dr. Jan Katz  of Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration will help you explore the five key dimensions of cross­cultural leadership: culture, context, risk, linear/parallel hierarchy, and individualism/collectivism . After defining and sharing examples of each, Professor Katz will help you explore their impacts on business and how you can adapt to variations in different cultures. This course gives you the tools you need to continuously improve your cross-cultural leadership skills.

In the course project, you will examine the cultures and dimensions you work in, explore how compensation relates to risk, examine the hierarchy at your company, and evaluate your own leadership style as it relates to the cultures you work in. You will also get to investigate the 2015 Greek financial crisis and interview an international colleague before creating an action plan for your own future education around the impact of cultural variation on leadership.

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