Choosing the Right Performance Measures for Your Organization introduces managers to the basics of measuring and reporting on the performance of your organization, whether it's a for-profit business, not-for profit, or governmental organization. You will learn about the different types of reporting systems these organizations use, with a focus on performance reporting systems: the systems that lay out an organization's strategy and report on how well that strategy is being executed. You will also take a detailed look at one of the most important tools for performance reporting, the Balanced Scorecard. The ultimate goal for this course is for you to be able to implement the Balanced Scorecard in your own organization.

Nearly every major regional healthcare facility in the United States is in the midst of or planning a capital improvement project. How can you be sure that such projects in your organization incorporate best practices and achieve their intended goals? The answer is to look at the evidence: what are the approaches that other healthcare facilities undertaking similar projects have used that have worked?

This course explores the use of Evidence-Based Design (EBD) to guide the planning, design and management of healthcare facilities and systems. After this course you will be a more intelligent and discerning consumers of research evidence and related information, and be more a productive participant in the planning and design process. You'll learn the key steps in the planning and design process with a focus on how the facility affects quality of care and the experience of patients and care-giving staff. Case studies illustrate design approaches that lend themselves to patient-centered care and that lead to greater operational efficiency and effectiveness. A course project provides students with the opportunity to apply what they're learning to the creation of an outline of a facility plan for their own organization.

The process of designing a healthcare facility has a special mission: to have a positive impact on its many users—including patients, families, visitors, nurses, physicians, and other clinical and non-clinical staff—while simultaneously fostering cost-effective operations. To achieve the best outcomes, it is important to involve a variety of stakeholders. An informed group can help to ensure a more efficient working process with architects and engineers, and can contribute to stronger, more broadly-based and more cost-effective decisions.

This course introduces the must-know concepts and related terminology of healthcare facility planning. The course touches on those aspects of capital improvement projects that a manager or stakeholder might encounter in a healthcare setting, including working from a budget to estimate potential sizing of facilities, estimating costs, and recognizing key features of architectural and engineering drawings. At the conclusion of the course, you will be a more intelligent consumer of information and a more effective participant in the healthcare facility planning and design process.

One of the challenges organizations face today is how to innovate. Innovation has become the modus operandi of organizational life. Every organization needs to innovate quickly to stay competitive. But what does “innovation” really mean?

In simple terms, innovation is the practical application of creative ideas to drive organizational results; innovation results in something useful that benefits the organization. In this course, Cornell University's Professor Samuel Bacharach, Ph.D., clears away common misconceptions about the mystery surrounding this popular buzzword and identifies how individuals can harness creative energy to drive innovative results. Students will identify strategies for encouraging divergent thinking and examine methods of fostering a culture of innovation.

All leadership is change leadership. Good leadership isn’t about stagnation; it’s about moving ahead. In this course, Cornell University's Professor Samuel Bacharach, Ph.D., explores the fundamental, practical skills that effective leaders have mastered.

Effective change leaders do three things; they anticipate where things are moving, they facilitate the implementation of change, and they sustain momentum by taking charge and moving things ahead. Great change leaders know how to be both proactive and reactive, as Professor Bacharach explains. Students in this course will examine their own leadership styles and practice skills that will help them translate ideas into organizational results, find ways to overcome organizational inertia, and examine strategies for overcoming individual resistance to change.

Leaders at every level need to be able to execute on their ideas. In virtually every case, this means that leaders need to be able to persuade others to join in this execution. In order to do so, understanding how to create and utilize power in an organization is critical.

In this course, developed by Professor Glen Dowell, Ph.D., of Cornell University’s Johnson Graduate School of Management, students will focus on their personal relationship with power as well as how power works in their organization and social network.

 

Project Management Institute (PMI®) Continuing Certification: Participants who successfully complete this course will receive 6 Professional Development Units (PDUs) from PMI®. Please contact PMI ® for details about professional project management certification or recertification.

 

Being able to negotiate is a practical, everyday skill that is critical for anyone working within an organization. The good news is it’s a skill you can practice and master. Negotiation skills are ones you can use in any context and, once you master the behaviors of effective negotiation, you will use all the time. In this course, developed by Cornell University's Professor Samuel Bacharach, Ph.D., you will develop an awareness that every conversation is a negotiation, and you will identify the critical components of effective negotiation.

Coaching is about building relationships—and it’s essential in order for your organization to move forward together to achieve better results. Being an effective coach requires skills that can be practiced and mastered, including listening, building credibility and trust, and showing empathy. In this course, Cornell University’s Dr. Samuel Bacharach, will help you distinguish between coaching and traditional supervision. You will identify the five functions of coaching and the rules for having coaching conversations. Finally, you will examine some of the classic coaching mistakes that people often make and identify how you can avoid repeating those mistakes yourself.

Many medical groups develop strategic plans that are never implemented because the plans did not articulate how to measure progress, did not assign resources to do the work, and did not consider how to report on the goals.

This course asks you to apply organizational information you’ve gathered using analysis tools such as SWOT, BCG, and Porter's Five Forces to develop a strategic plan that includes specific details about who, what, when, where, and how to work on each of the agreed-upon strategic goals.

Ultimately, this course will equip you with the tools to be able to develop a comprehensive strategic plan that involves the right stakeholders and that aligns with your organization’s core mission and values.

Healthcare delivery continues to be in a state of constant change and as a result, today’s healthcare leaders must transform the way their organizations respond to and lead change initiatives. In this course, professionals will “reset” their thinking around how best to understand, measure, implement, and lead successful change initiatives.

Leaders will assess their current culture, map out the ideal future state, create a business strategy consistent with the organization’s vision and values, and ultimately implement the strategies or business processes needed to affect and support the organizational culture they want.

Healthcare organizations and the physicians who run them often approach the task of management in much the same way as they approach a patient: they quickly identify symptoms or problems, make a diagnosis or analysis, and develop a treatment plan or solution. While this technique may work when making decisions about day-to-day operations, it’s inadequate for evaluating the overall health of an organization and for making long-term survival plans. Effective strategic planning requires healthcare managers to shift their perspective from being a service organization to being a business.

This course teaches you several models to help you lay the foundations of a strategic plan based on the existing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats facing your organization. Ultimately, you will learn how to collect the right data to help you evaluate whether to invest in, discontinue, or develop certain products and services to ensure any strategic plan you devize will be profitable and in alignment with your organization’s mission and vision.

The American healthcare system is continuously in flux and requires adaptability from those working in the industry. As a leader, it’s also imperative that you make your organizations efficient and safe; improving quality is job number one. This unique balance of priorities requires healthcare leaders to ensure that everyone across the organization is in support of and working towards achieving new initiatives that will secure organization’s competitiveness into the future.

In this course, you will learn how to prepare your organization for change at the individual, departmental, and organizational level by focusing on communication and the development of a change management plan.

The ability to make effective and timely decisions is an essential skill for successful executives. Mastery of this skill influences all aspects of day-to-day operations as well as strategic planning. In this course, developed by Professor Robert Bloomfield, Ph.D. of Cornell University’s Johnson Graduate School of Management, you will hone your decision-making skills by following a methodology based on tested actions and sound organizational approaches. You will leave this course better equipped to confidently tackle any decision large or small, and you’ll do so in a way that creates the optimal conditions for success.

In today's workforce, adaptation and responsiveness are key elements in the success for an organization. As turnaround times shorten and demands increase, organizations must leverage teams to reach strategic goals and fulfill initiatives. Based on the expertise and research of Kate Walsh, PhD, students in this course will diagnose team needs, set expectations for development, utilize conflict to augment change, and build team autonomy to support leaders in embracing a more strategic focus.

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